Tag Archive: Christianity


Dear Diary,

My aunt died last Monday.  Last time I saw her was on New Year’s day for our yearly family reunion.  She was healthy.  She was active.  She was dancing and singing.  No sign of anything amiss.

January 29, I receive a message from my mom, telling me that my aunt was in the ICU because of a rare disease called Guillain-Barre Syndrome.  I went straight to google to see what I could find.

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/guillain-barre-syndrome/basics/definition/con-20025832

1 to 2 cases out of 100,000 per year.

The treatment was expensive.  Her immediate family was able to start her on the daily treatment.  But it was too late.  After a week in ICU, my aunt passed away.

My prayers go out to her family.  To my dad, who was really close to her.  I, unfortunately, was not.  It was only through our yearly family reunion that I got to talk to her, to hear her stories and to tell her briefly how I have been.

Life is unpredictable.  No one ever knows when it’s their time.  Someone can live their life forever scared of all the possible horror that they might experience, or live like there’s no tomorrow, but in the end it’s still the same story.

Life is unpredictable.  And yet it is beautiful.  It defines you.  The life you have is based on how you have acted on the unpredictability of it.  On what you have done.

But this life is not all that there is.  There is something beyond life that is more beautiful.  More unpredictable, because we do not know.  We may know enough to want it.  But we’ll never know until we get there.  That is the beauty of the afterlife.  The mystery.

Sometimes I wonder about people who don’t believe in the afterlife.  Do they think that this is all there is?  What becomes the meaning of life for them?  Thinking that after this life, it’s the end.  Like a game over with no replays.  Do they enjoy their life more, knowing that everything ends and then nothing.

That is very sad.  I don’t think I could enjoy my life thinking that there is nothing beyond the years that I have on this earth.  I would keep asking myself everyday, what is the purpose of all this…

Much worse, in my opinion, is believing in everything or believing in something vague.

So, dear reader, if you have reached this last part of the post, I’m here to tell you what my purpose is in life.  It’s to tell you about Christ Jesus, who died for our sins.  All you have to do is accept Him as your personal Savior.  It’s that easy.  Yet it’s the hardest thing to do, because it involves putting your trust in Him and it means that you will change your ways because you now have accepted Him into your heart.

Life is unpredictable.  Don’t let it be too late.

AvA Martini

THE TWO NATURES
By George Feldmann
IMG_0229 copy

The very moment one exercises saving faith in the Lord Jesus Christ as Saviour, a new nature is imparted by the Holy Spirit to the believer.  This is described as regeneration in Titus 3:5 and 6.  Immediately a hitherto unknown conflict also begins within.  The two natures each strive to go in opposite directions, and to have the upper hand in the life of the believer.

Both natures cannot reign at the same time, so one will have to be rendered inoperative, or put out of commission.  It is here that the will of the believer comes into play and determines which of the two natures shall rule.  A good chapter for study in this subject is Romans 6.  Our salvation puts us in union with Christ in His death, burial, and resurrection, and we are identified with Him.  This is what is meant by the word baptism in Romans 6:3.  His victory can be our victory in a practical sense in our daily lives.  In fact this is the will of God for all believers.

This identification with Christ gives the believer both the power and the authority to exercise the will over the old nature. This is a wonderful privilege because the believer can demonstrate in his own life the power and glory of the Lord’s resurrection for all the world to see.

Even though the believer determines which nature shall rule in his life, it is also very important for him to remember that the old man (nature) is not dead or eradicated when rendered inoperative: it is ready to spring to life the very moment the new nature is dethroned by the believer.  The old nature will not be eradicated until resurrection.

In Eph. 4:22-24 we are told to put off… the old man. The negative comes first. The positive, put on the new man. As nature abhors a vacuum. so it is folly to stop at the negative position and try to make the Christian life a series of don’ts. We put on and continually grow in the Lord, going on to perfection (maturity).

PS.
1. Christian life does not stop in Salvation (In Christ), we study to grow unto adoption (maturity), then service (to reign with Him).
2. The Lord gave us the NN, He did not repair the OSN. We need to continue studying the Word of God to feed our New Nature (NN) and to disable the Old Sin Nature (OSN). OSN will only be totally gone in the resurrection.
Eph 4:23-24 Col 3:10
3.When we became a Christian we became a New Creature (New Creation- born again) 1Cor 2:14 “But the natural man (the flesh) receiveth not the things of the Spirit of God…”
Gal 6:15- “For in Christ Jesus neither circumcision availeth any thing, nor uncircumcision, but a new creature. (No ritual)
2Cor 5:17-21 – “Therefore If any man be in Christ, he is a new creature: old things are passed away, behold all things are become new”
John 14:17. “…for He dwelleth with you, and shall be in you.”

Note:  Since I couldn’t go to church today, because I woke up late due to my night shift, I decided to post a lesson here instead.

“Every Promise in the Book is Mine”

by Robert K. Brown, Jr. of Grace Publications

In the days of Peter, people struggled to understand the writings of Paul (2 Peter 3:15-16), and we are no different today. At that time there were many systems of interpreting the Bible with the Sadducees, the Pharisees, and others, and with many differing groups within the Pharisees. Today many more systems have been added, but which one is right? Or, if not right, best?

One popular thought in certain areas of American Christianity is that it makes no difference what a person believes as long as they attend church somewhere and they obey that church’s teaching. This certainly has the advantage of reducing both inter-church competition and friction between believers. However, it serves only to avoid real issues concerning biblical interpretation since it assumes that every church’s doctrine is within tolerance of God’s truth, even though some churches hold completely opposite and incompatible views. Thus although this position may have sociological advantages, it is not designed for searching out biblical truths.

Another common view is expressed in a popular song, often taught to children, but which forms some adult attitudes. “Every promise in the Book is mine, every chapter, every verse, every line.” 

Now the Bible is filled with promises. Some were made to Noah, others to Abraham; some to Moses, others to David; some to Peter, others to Paul. Was Noah promised the same as Abraham? Was Moses promised that his sons would rule Israel as was David? Was Paul promised that he would sit on one of the twelve thrones judging the tribes of Israel as was Peter?

If a church teaches that “every promise in the book is mine”, does it mean that every promise in the book becomes mine? The answer is simple of course. Every promise in the Book is not mine! But why not?

We all hold erroneous views and we have to ask by what standard is truth judged? Is it the Bible or some church? If a church teaches that Christians today are the Spiritual Israel, does that mean believers today are a spiritual Israel? If one church teaches that Christians should observe a sabbath of rest from sunset Friday to sunset Saturday, while another says Sunday replaced the seventh day of sabbath, while a third states that Gentile Christians were never commanded to keep any sabbath, which is correct, if any?

Without a consistent method of interpretation there is a danger that Christians feel the right to go through Scripture selecting the promises they want, like choosing food from a menu in a restaurant, selecting favorites and leaving ones not liked. In other words, Christians go through selecting some promises and leaving others, selecting promises of blessing, but rejecting promises of judgement!

But the Bible was not given to be used like a menu. God inspired many different men to write over many hundreds of years. These authors wrote to particular people, addressing specific problems. Thus the basic of any consistent method of interpretation should be paying attention not only to what was said, but also to whom or of whom it is said. Also the time factor needs to be considered; either when it was said or to when it relates. Lastly, place may also be important; to where does it pertain. These give us building blocks for constructing a consistent understanding of Scripture. Ignoring them can lead to serious error, as the following old story illustrates.

A person was in a desperate situation from which he could see no escape. He turned to the Bible which he closed, stood on end, and let fall open. With eyes closed he placed a finger on the page and looked at the verse indicated. It read, “Judas went out and hanged himself”. Not liking this he repeated the process. The second verse was “Go thou and do likewise”. In desperation he tried a third time. The result? “Then said Jesus unto him, That thou goest, do quickly.”

Obviously all three verses were taken out of context and no truth can be derived from such a method. But equally no truth can be obtained by selecting promises from the Bible as one chooses food from a menu! Every promise in the book belongs to someone, but they cannot all belong to me, or to you. In order to help us appreciate which ones are ours we need to pay attention not only to what a promise says, but to whom it was made, to when it relates, and to where it pertains.

Taken from: http://rightdivision.com/every-promise-book-mine

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